Tosca

  October 4. 2013.

1008-tosca_2

Puccini: Tosca

Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. It premiered at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome on 14 January 1900. The work, based on Victorien Sardou’s 1887 French-language dramatic play, La Tosca, is a melodramatic piece set in Rome in June 1800, with the Kingdom of Naples’s control of Rome threatened by Napoleon’s invasion of Italy. It contains depictions of torture, murder and suicide, yet also includes some of Puccini’s best-known lyrical arias, and has inspired memorable performances from many of opera’s leading singers.

Musically, Tosca is structured as a through-composed work, with arias, recitative, choruses and other elements musically woven into a seamless whole. Puccini used Wagnerian leitmotifs (short musical statements) to identify characters, objects and ideas. The dramatic force of Tosca and its characters continues to fascinate both performers and audiences, and the work remains one of the most frequently performed operas.

Victorien_Sardou_in_1901  Victorien Sardou  (1831 – 1908) was a French dramatist.  He is best remembered today for his development, along with Eugène Scribe, of the well-made play. He also wrote several plays that were made into popular 19th-century operas such as La Tosca (1887) and Fedora by Umberto Giordano, a work that popularized the fedora hat as well.

 

 

 

 

La_Tosca_poster_at noveau   La Tosca is a five-act drama by the 19th-century French  playwright Victorien Sardou. It was first performed on 24 November 1887 at the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin in Paris, with Sarah Bernhardt in the title role. Despite negative reviews from the Paris critics at the opening night, it became one of Sardou’s most successful plays and was toured by Bernhardt throughout the world in the years following its premiere. The play itself is no longer performed, but its operatic adaptation, Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca, has achieved enduring popularity. There have been several other adaptations of the play including two for the Japanese theatre and an English burlesque, Tra-La-La Tosca (all of which premiered in the 1890s) as well as several film versions.

Bernhardt_as_Tosca  Sarah Bernhardt (French pronunciation: ​[sa.ʁa bɛʁ.nɑʁt];[2] c. 22/23 October 1844 – 26 March 1923) was a French stage and early film actress, and has been referred to as “the most famous actress the world has ever known.”[3] Bernhardt made her fame on the stages of France in the 1870s, at the beginning of the Belle Epoque period, and was soon in demand in Europe and the Americas. She developed a reputation as a serious dramatic actress, earning the nickname “The Divine Sarah.” This photo is in her famous role, Tosca.

 

Eleonora Duse   Eleonora Duse (1858 –  1924) was an Italian actress, often known simply as Duse. She was born in Vigevano, Lombardy, and began acting as a child. Both her father and her grandfather were actors, and she joined the troupe at age four. Due to poverty, she initially worked continually, traveling from city to city with whichever troupe her family was currently engaged. She came to fame in Italian versions of roles made famous by Sarah Bernhardt, among them Tosca. She gained her first major success in Europe, then toured South America, Russia and the United States; beginning the tours as a virtual unknown but leaving in her wake a general recognition of her genius. While she made her career and fame performing in the theatrical “warhorses” of her day, she is today remembered more for her association with the plays of Gabriele d’Annunzio and Henrik Ibsen.

A few of themost beloved scenes and arias from Puccini;s masterpiece: Recordita, Te Deum scene, Cavaradossi’s aria, Love Duet and Scarpia’s Death.

Recommended viewing:

November 9. 2013. Cineplex Theatres “Live from the Met” series.
Encores: December 7. and 16. 2013.

Tosca's prayer

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